love and sex in a book

For discussion of issues pertaining to sexuality. Warning: Topics within this forum may contain frank discussion of a sexual nature.
michaels
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Joined: Sat Apr 16, 2011 8:11 am

love and sex in a book

Postby michaels » Wed Jun 08, 2011 2:54 pm

I'm reading the strangest novel on earth for an aromantic asexual to read: Gabriel Garcia Marquez's _Love in the Time of Cholera_. Many of you have probably seen the movie but not read the book, but I haven't seen the movie. The book is entirely devoted to that strange mishmash of love and sex that is peculiar to some cultures whose members have trouble telling them apart. From my perspective the novel is a perfect example why sove or lex or whatever you want to call this mishmash, is a live-destroying affliction which people are best advised to avoid. For the first time ever I feel grateful to be both aromantic and asexual because, for the rest of my life, I'll be spared a lot of agony that romantics and sexuals must endure.

I'm not sure I can finish the book despite Garcia Marquez's beautiful prose, which no English-language writer has matched in the last 300 years. I mean, admiring someone's technique is good, but it can carry you only so far in an activity you do for relaxation.

Roy
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Joined: Tue Nov 24, 2009 12:22 am

Re: love and sex in a book

Postby Roy » Wed Jun 08, 2011 5:20 pm

Love and sex are greatly exaggerated in any book, it's the reason I stopped reading even though I was a huge book reader. Not to be dismissive of your opinion, but I wouldn't place too much stock in a romance novel. Instead, perhaps you want to examine that while the book itself may or may not be a realistic representation of the real mechanics of love and sex, people do still read it and get a certain amount of romantic satisfaction from it. Why that is is a more fascinating phenomenon than the book itself.

michaels
Super Member
Posts: 251
Joined: Sat Apr 16, 2011 8:11 am

Re: love and sex in a book

Postby michaels » Fri Jun 10, 2011 8:57 am

Indeed. But it should be noted that Garcia Marquez is a nobel prize winner who has written the equivalent of the body of work of Shakespeare in Spanish-language literature (I mean _One Hundred Years of Solitude_). Anything he writes is going to be more than just another romance novel in the sense of a Harlequin or vampire novel. I'm still slogging through _Love in the Time of Cholera_ based on his reputation and the admittedly excellent writing he does. As a guy who used to write short fiction for fun, I appreciate that kind of thing.

In terms of why romantics and sexuals enjoy reading unrealistic romances, it is the tradition of popular entertainment to be unrealistic and exaggerated. Nearly every movie made, for example, is about someone who overcomes insurmountable obstacles and triumphs despite having maybe a 0.0001% chance even to survive. I find that kind of thing pernicious, but it's an integral part of American culture, and nothing can be done about it other than to ignore it. In terms of romance, people probably get tired of the cheap and tawdry divorces and child custody battles that populate the average person's real life and want to be entertained with stories of people who are better human beings than them and therefore have more exalting experiences. This is also something that runs counter to my nature, as I've always derived more pleasure from stories about the humdrum and ordinary. I just don't like the culture of false hope.